Tag Archives: investigation

Survivorman And Todd Standing Together Again!

Here is a video of my opinion on the ongoing association between Les Stroud, and one Todd Standing.

It is already well known that  I put little credibility in the activities of Mr Standing.  However, I have a good deal of respect for the work of Mr Stroud.  So, is it any wonder, the mind boggles at the fact Mr Stroud is still taken in by this man’s ongoing attention seeking antics.   In my  opinion, Mr Standing  suffers from what I refer to as ‘Ivan Marks Syndrome’; more concerned with being famous and the center of attention than any concern over the possible existence of an unknown primate.

Well, one can only hope that Mr Stroud will see the light before too much damage is done.

Thomas Steenburg

Old Stomping Grounds

On April 19, 2015, myself and colleagues again returned to an area which I have spent much time in over the years, with it’s long history of possible encounters as well as continued reports which come to light every now and then.

The Riverside Recreation area, where in 1986 one of the more interesting and amazing incidents occurred which I have personally investigated, was revisited again, and some filming was done for a future DVD documentary.

I am still amazed how much of the sighting location has changed since 1986.  Tracks which were found along a small creek bank (Buldbeard Creek) was basically an open area back then, is now filled with new-growth trees.  Only a few of the old growth which were there in 1986, as well as the rock slide area, now make the the spot even recognizable.  When filming at the campsite  itself, it was rather humorous to have the camp host walk up to our group wondering who we were, and finding out about our interest in the Sasquatch, immediately let out a tirade of “Oh, that’s only a legend”; “There is no such thing”; “The story about what happened here in 1986, never happened”; etc, etc.

When I identified myself as the fellow who investigated the incident in 1986, he calmed down somewhat but we sure didn’t change his mind on the subject at all.  Before this, we had drove up high above the Chilliwack River Valley, which gave us a great view of the area. The photo below is looking down the valley .

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Afterwards, we headed up the Nesakwatch FSR.   A very enjoyable day out in the forests of British Columbia but, again, nothing of real interest Sasquatch-wise was encountered.

Thomas Steenburg

Another Outing And Still Hoping

Today,  April 13, 2015, myself along with Brad and Jason, decided to check out an area which was fairly close by on a local FSR where I was told a possible Sasquatch sighting had occurred just a few weeks before.  The gent walked up to me while I was at the Co-op filling station in Hatzic, BC.   He was in a hurry so I gave him one of my cards and he agreed to call to set up a proper interview for a later date.

However, he did give me enough information as to figure out the location.  We felt we could at least check the area out in the meantime, as I knew the bridge in question, having been there a number of times in the past.  My two colleagues had also been there before, as well.  The bridge in question is in the photo below.

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The witness in this case reported that he was traveling  over the bridge and was following the road as it veered left up a slight upgrade when he spotted a large, black, upright figure disappearing into the trees on the drivers side of the road, about 300 hundred feet beyond the bridge.  The witness did slow down as he passed the spot but did not stop.  I hope to get a lot more details soon.

Our searching of the area did uncover what appears to be a game trail about where he claims to have seen the animal (see photo below) but of course there were no footprints or any other evidence in the area to support the sighting.   This was not surprising considering all the rain that has fallen.

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So another possible sighting?  Hopefully more will come to light in the following days.

Thomas Steenburg

 

 

Sometimes It’s Too Crowded

This past Easter weekend, myself and some colleagues again decided to venture into the mountains to search for evidence for the existence of the Sasquatch.

Being a long weekend with the weather nice, and the fact I have encountered this situation more times in the past than I can count, I should have remembered beforehand that every Tom, Dick and Harry from the cities with campers or a tent head out into the accessible areas of our forests, to consume too much beer, scream and howl like morons, and just behave like spoiled idiots.  And let’s not forget going home the last day leaving tons of trash behind.

Such was the case again during this Easter weekend of 2015.   We had planned to return to an area of one of my better-known investigations to relive some of my recollections, and search the area once again for a fish stringer a Sasquatch was purported to have stolen from a campsite in 1986.

However, our plans had to change drastically when the the place was found to be over-flowing with campers so numerous, that every pullout within 5 kilometers seemed to have three or four tents and RVs, packed in like sardines.

We ended up traveling  approximately 10 kilometers into the high-country before we had any room to search without running into the Bundy family, partying with Adams family.  One group of face-panted weirdos, marching down a dirt road, reminded me of a group of hippies in company with a circus freak show; would you believe the head moron was leading the way blowing on a bullhorn which he’d wrapped around his upper torso?

Well, any Sasquatch, or any other wildlife, would have kept well hidden on such an occasion when their normally peaceful wilderness home gets invaded by the, ‘NIGHT OF THE LIVING BRAIN-DEAD’. The ironic thing is: these folks are just the type who, when they learn of our interest in the Sasquatch mystery, have the nerve to call us strange.  Some people never grow up.

Thomas Steenburg

Morris Mountain

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PHOTO taken of Morris Mountain – August 21, 2014

On the spur of the moment last night (March 21, 2015) I decided to do a late night run to an area of which I have visited a hundred times before: a large, old-growth covered hill just north of the Chehalis First Nation Reserve, which is named Morris Mountain.

This large hill has a place in Sasquatch history and lore as a place which, according to the Chehalis people, is where, in years past, the Sasquatch would gather and light fires, to look down upon the land they had lost to the Chehalis people in battle – generations before.  Mount Morris was for many years considered where semi-civilization ended and true wilderness began.

It is the location of another ‘Classic’ tale of the Sasquatch, the story of Serephine Long, who was a young woman of 17.  In the year 1871, it was said that the young 17 year old was carried off by a Sasquatch and taken to a cave on Morris Mountain.  After having her eyes covered with pitch, she was held captive by a number of the creatures but was mainly the possession of the large male who had kidnapped her.

Her story was not made known until she told it to J.W. Burns (whom coined the term Sasquatch in 1929) when she was a very old woman, during the 1930s.  She stayed with the Sasquatch family for about a year and, in failing health, had kept pleading with her captors that she wished to return home before she died.

I suppose the continuous nagging was too much, even for a Sasquatch, and the creature again put her over its shoulder and dropped her in the same area he had found her a year before.  When she was found by her people, she was said to be close to death, unable to tell of what happened to her and later that same night gave birth to a deformed baby which died soon after birth.  I have only seen one photograph of Serephine Long, taken in 1941, when she was about 87 years old.  She died not long after that.

Another Classic tale in an area of Classic history – a place of continued reports until this day.  In fact, I was on Mount Morris when a lady had her sighting at Weaver Lake, August  21, 2014 – only four kilometers away.  Having only found out about it after I returned home and heard her phone message on my answering service later that evening, I went to the scene the next morning with a colleague, Brad Trent, to investigate.

So Morris Mountain continues to be an area of interest to those investigating the Sasquatch mystery; every bit as much today as in the distant past.  Such thoughts kept going through my mind as I drove slowly over the mountain around midnight last night, through thick patches of dense fog, then no fog at all, then a second patch, wondering would this trip result in a personal sighting?

Stopping by a pond area where the frogs are like a choir with the chirping of hundreds; suddenly all going silent at the same time and me wondering: why?   After about 60 seconds one frog starts up, and in a few moments they are all going again, whatever it was which caused them to go suddenly silent, was no longer considered a threat.  After about 20 minutes, I went back to the vehicle still wondering what caused the sudden silence, as my movements didn’t seem to cause the same effect…

Like all my other visits to Morris Mountain, I come home having seen nothing myself but still having the thought that perhaps, just perhaps, a Sasquatch was watching me. I will be going back.

Thomas Steenburg

Searching And Searching And Searching

Tomorrow afternoon, myself and three like-minded colleagues will once again head into the back country with the hope and dream of encountering a Sasquatch; or finding evidence of the creature’s presence.

God only knows how many trips looking for evidence this will be for me, as I lost count years ago.  In all this time I may have had a possible, fleeting glimpse myself – only once.  I have seen possible footprints on six occasions; collected hair samples from sighting locations which, so far, turned out to be from other wildlife.

We recently had rocks thrown at us, or at least we assume it was rocks since we never saw them, just heard them ripping through the greenery.  Plus, the fact we never saw what or who was throwing them?

On another occasion, myself and Bill Miller were stumped at a tree line wondering what was the cause of a very unpleasant odor which assailed our nostrils.  I went into the trees expecting to find something dead, but found nothing, and even more puzzling was after a time this unpleasant odor dissipated rather quickly, leaving us more perplexed?  Was a Sasquatch responsible – who knows? The fact is that we never saw the cause.  So, even though the possibility is there, we can’t just assume it to be so – far too much of that going on in this research.

But it’s the possibility that keeps my interest alive.  So tomorrow, we try again.  But I am well aware of the fact that the odds are overwhelming that this won’t be the last time.

Thomas Steenburg

Don’t Fear Admitting to A Mistake

Researchers in this field of study must remain on guard against developing an inflated ego.  When recognition for past work, for the most part, seems to be looked upon with favour it is too easy to become pigheaded, and develop a sense of ‘I am always right and others who disagree with me are always wrong’.

I have had a great many arguments in the past that I now regret, as I realize the person with whom I was arguing with, might have indeed had a valid point.  It is easy to fall into the trap of arrogance.  However, to realize you have made a mistake, yet continue to move in a direction you know is wrong, is by far, much worse.

One of my own cases was dealing with a well-known Sasquatch skeptic, the late Michael Dennet.  Mr. Dennet had always been very critical of so-called evidence brought forward by the late Paul Freeman.  In the early 1980s, I believed Paul Freeman and most of the evidence he brought forward, and defended him much longer than perhaps should have.  I also had a few long, drawn-out debates with Mr Dennet concerning Freeman’s findings and conclusions.

Well, over time – and looking into the matter – I studied the evidence, I talked to people involved and I learned things.  I can say, right here and now, that in the case of the late Paul Freeman, the late Mr. Dennet was right and I was wrong.

Being wrong is nothing to be afraid of.  We all make mistakes in the Sasquatch field, and admitting to them takes nothing away from a researcher’s credibility.  In fact, in my view, it improves it.

So, if there are any researchers out there whom may feel now, after much sober, second thought, that perhaps they had been taken in somewhat by, oh I don’t know, Todd Standing; or perhaps a researcher was a little to quick to jump on the Massacre at Bluff Creek band wagon, it is far better to admit to a mistake than carry on knowing you are wrong.  Or even just going silent on a particular issue hoping the whole thing just blows over.

Making mistakes is a learning experience.  I now always listen to what people have to say, even if I disagree with them.  I will always keep an open mind when doing so even though they’re wrong! 😛

Thomas Steenburg

REMEMBERING RENE DAHINDEN

Rene was Rene. That really, in a nutshell, was the only way to describe the man.  We were good friends – I loved the guy.  So, when I was asked about him during a recent outing, the memory came back of two trips with Rene, in the same general area that we were now standing.  I was much younger then and at times my inexperience would show.  Something Rene would never, and I mean NEVER, fail to point out!

Rest in peace, my friend – I miss you.

HIBERNATION

I have been asked many times in the past what I felt on the issue of Hibernation and whether I felt that this may be an explanation for the sharp decrease of reports during the winter months.  This short interview was recorded by Jason Cain on a recent winter outing, Sunday January 18, 2015 and expresses my own views on the subject.

Thomas Steenburg

TURN ON THE COMMON SENSE SWITCH

We are flooded with claims of encounters today which sound too incredible to be true. With the internet making it so easy for the tellers of wild yarns to make false claims so readily available to a ever increasing numbers of the gullible, so-called researchers are more interested in attention than whether or not such a creature exists.

“IVAN MARKS SYNDROME”. To the public in general it must seem that the community of Sasquatch research more resembles an Asylum being run by the inmates!  And this tragic situation seems to be getting worse rather than better.  In this mess, what advice can an old timer like me give to a young guy or girl who really wants to become involved with doing their own research?  How does one advise how to avoid the BS?

Well, you can’t. All honest researchers have to learn how to spot this stuff on their own. The best way to do this is when you are investigating a claim from a witness or on going claims from other researchers, take in all the information you can, stand back and turn your common sense switch.  View everything with a healthy dose of skepticism. Skepticism is the best quality a researcher can have.   After all, we are researchers trying to find an answer to a mystery; we are not some kind of religious leaders trying to push a faith.

Thomas Steenburg